Physician Resources

Please call our office direct to schedule your patients' appointment with us. Please use the location guide to navigate to the correct phone number.


Our Locations

Albany Advanced Imaging

3 Atrium Drive
Albany, NY 12205

(518) 438-0600
(518) 435-0738

Map & Directions

Clifton Park Advanced Imaging

648 Plank Rd, Entrance B
Clifton Park, NY 12065

(518) 688-1177
(518) 688-1199

Map & Directions

Albany Open MRI

199 Wolf Rd
Albany, NY 12205

(518) 435-1234
(518) 435-0079

Map & Directions

Patroon Creek Imaging

400 Patroon Creek Blvd #100
Albany, NY 12206

(518) 618-1662
(518) 618-1664

Map & Directions


Synapse PACS / Images and Reports

  • Coming Soon.

Exam Preparation

MRI (350lb weight limit)

  • Certain metallic devices may preclude MRI exam
    • Pacemaker
    • Nerve stimulator
    • Drug infusion device, insulin pump
    • Artificial heart valve
    • Cochlear implants
    • Hearing aids
    • Vascular stents
    • Aneurysm clips
    • Metal fragments
    • Bullets, BBs, or shrapnel
    • History of metal work
  • Indicate on the order if the patient is allergic to IV gadolinium contrast
    • Contrast is generally avoided in these cases
  • IV gadolinium contrast cannot be given to pregnant patients
  • Claustrophobic patients may benefit from single dose anxiolytic (patient should have a driver)
  • If the patient is at risk for renal insufficiency, we recommend having recent kidney function tests (within 30 days); IV gadolinium generally will not be given if GFR <30. Risk factors for renal insufficiency:
    • History of kidney failure/dialysis
    • Kidney surgery
    • Single kidney
    • Kidney cancer
    • Diabetes
    • High blood pressure
    • Age > 60 years
  • If your patient is having an MRI of your pelvic floor (MR defecography), she/he will be given specific bowel prep instructions at the time of scheduling
  • If your patient is having an MRI enterography exam for bowel disease, we will ask him/her to drink contrast material

CT (450lb weight limit)

  • Indicate on the order if the patient is allergic to anxiolytic iodinated nonionic IV gadolinium contrast
    • Contrast is generally avoided in these cases
  • If the patient is pregnant, an alternative exam should be considered
  • Your patient may be asked to drink oral contrast if having a CT of the abdomen/pelvis
  • If the patient is at risk for renal insufficiency, we recommend having recent kidney function tests (within 30 days); IV contrast generally will not be given if GFR <30. Risk factors for renal insufficiency:
    • History of kidney failure/dialysis
    • Kidney surgery
    • Single kidney
    • Kidney cancer
    • Diabetes
    • High blood pressure
    • Age > 60 years

Ultrasound

  • If your patient is having an ultrasound of your abdomen or gallbladder, we request NPO 8 hours prior to the exam
  • If your patient is having an ultrasound of your urinary bladder or a pelvic ultrasound (uterus/ovaries), we request arriving with a full bladder

X-Ray

  • No specific exam preparation
  • If the patient is pregnant, an alternative exam should be considered

DEXA Bone Density

  • No specific exam preparation
  • If the patient is pregnant, an alternative exam should be considered

Nuclear Medicine (325lb weight limit)

  • List of medications

FAQ's

How can I schedule an appointment for my patient?

Have your office staff or patient call our office directly.

How do I get prior authorization for my patient?

Prior authorization for CT and MR exams are required by some private health insurers. The patient will need to check with their insurance and if a prior authorization is required, the referring provider’s office will need to contact the insurer to get the approval.

How long will it take to get the radiology report?

Most reports are generated within 24 hours. Our office staff and radiologists are readily available by phone if you have any issues or questions.

How will I receive the radiology report?

Reports are faxed to the offices of the referring healthcare provider. Reports will also appear in the Athena electronic medical record.

Should my patient receive CT iodinated IV contrast?

For CT of the abdomen/pelvis, generally IV contrast is administered, with the exception of renal colic evaluation and in the setting of GFR<30.

For CT of the chest, generally contrast should be given if you suspect infection, pleural disease, or mass/neoplastic process. Contrast is always given for suspected pulmonary embolism. Contrast is generally not given in the case of high resolution chest CT or follow up of a known pulmonary nodule.

Contrast is generally not given for head CT unless you suspect mass/neoplasm or infection. Contrast is generally not given in spine CT unless you suspect infection.

Contrast is always given for CTA exams.

If your patient has an allergy to contrast material or GFR <30, contrast should be avoided.

Should my patient receive MRI gadolinium IV contrast?

For MRI, when you suspect infection or a mass/neoplastic process, in general contrast should be given.

If your patient has an allergy to contrast material or GFR <30, contrast should be avoided. Gadolinium MRI contrast should not be given to pregnant patients. No MRIs during the 1st trimester, pregnant patients will need both the referring Physicians consent as well as the consent of their OB/GYN.


RADIATION SAFETY INFORMATION (FOR MDS)

We are exposed to radiation from natural sources each day.  Radiography (x-rays), CT, nuclear medicine, and DEXA all use radiation to form images.  These exams provide valuable information so that referring healthcare providers are better able to make accurate diagnoses.  There are many different ways to measure radiation, and different organs and tissues demonstrate varying sensitivity to radiation exposure.  In general, young people (and fetuses) are more radiation sensitive than adults. 

As a point of reference, an average person in the US living at sea level receives about 3 mSv per year; people living in higher elevations receive 4.5 mSv.  The largest source of naturally occurring radiation is radon gas, in our homes.

For this procedure:

* An adult’s approximate effective radiation dose is:

Comparable to natural background radiation for:

ABDOMINAL REGION:

Computed Tomography (CT)-Abdomen and Pelvis

10 mSv

3 years

Computed Tomography (CT)-Abdomen and Pelvis, repeated with and without contrast material

20 mSv

7 years

Computed Tomography (CT)-Colonography

6 mSv

2 years

Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP)

3 mSv

1 year

Radiography (X-ray)-Lower GI Tract

8 mSv

3 years

Radiography (X-ray)-Upper GI Tract

6 mSv

2 years

BONE:

Radiography (X-ray)-Spine

1.5 mSv

6 months

Radiography (X-ray)-Extremity

0.001 mSv

3 hours

CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM:

Computed Tomography (CT)-Head

2 mSv

8 months

Computed Tomography (CT)-Head, repeated with and without contrast material

4 mSv

16 months

Computed Tomography (CT)-Spine

6 mSv

2 years

CHEST:

Computed Tomography (CT)-Chest

7 mSv

2 years

Computed Tomography (CT)-Lung Cancer Screening

1.5 mSv

6 months

Radiography-Chest

0.1 mSv

10 days

DENTAL:

Intraoral X-ray

0.005 mSv

1 day

HEART:

Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA)

12 mSv

4 years

Cardiac CT for Calcium Scoring

3 mSv

1 year

MEN'S IMAGING:

Bone Densitometry (DEXA)

0.001 mSv

3 hours

NUCLEAR MEDICINE:

Positron Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

25 mSv

8 years

WOMEN'S IMAGING:

Bone Densitometry (DEXA)

0.001 mSv

3 hours

Mammography

0.4 mSv

7 weeks

For more radiation safety resources:


IV Contrast Guidelines

Please refer to our protocols/policies website for the latest on IV contrast media:

For more IV contrast resources:


Order Forms

  • Coming soon

Helpful Links

MRI Albany New York
PET Scan Albany New York
Ultrasound Albany New York
Nuclear Medicine Albany New York
Breast MRI Albany New York
CT Scan Albany New York
Breast Ultrasound Albany New York
Mammography Albany New York
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